In Post-Khashoggi Saudi Arabia, Business Leaders Have a Chance to Fill a Moral Void

With the U.S. government slow to respond to the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, business leaders took the lead by pulling out of Saudi Arabia’s investor conference. Yale SOM’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld and journalist Roya Hakakian write that continued business activism can help bring about positive change in the Middle East.

https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/in-post-khashoggi-saudi-arabia-business-leaders-have-chance-to-fill-moral-void?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=In%20Post-Khashoggi%20Saudi%20Arabia%2C%20Business%20Leaders%20Have%20a%20Chance%20to%20Fill%20a%20Moral%20Void&utm_campaign=insights-newsletter-nov-long2018

Retirement: No More Golden Years

Seniors in a California home exercise while seated; Japanese elderly work out

The world has inequalities of many kinds, and retirement is no exception. Government-sponsored pensionable retirement programs are popular worldwide, regarded as essential in the wealthiest economies. “Retirement programs are similar in purpose, yet differ considerably in scope, coverage, contributions, requirements, taxes, eligibility and benefits,” explains demography expert Joseph Chamie. “Official retirement ages, for example, range from 50 to 70 years, with most concentrated between 60 and 65 years.” Longer lifespans increase the years people spend in retirement, increasing costs for governments, employers and individual retirees. According to Chamie, solutions include hiking retirement ages and reducing retirement benefits, increasing taxes, shifting from defined-benefit to defined-contribution plans, and promoting incentives among workers to save more and work longer. Protests quickly form when governments move to cut retirement benefits, and many workers worry that a comfortable retirement is not in their future. – YaleGlobal

 

Program offers Chinese youth leaders perspectives on U.S. government

Participants in the sixth annual China-Yale Youth Leaders Dialogue appear with Pericles Lewis at the Greenberg Conference Center

Participants in the sixth annual China-Yale Youth Leaders Dialogue appeared with Pericles Lewis, Yale University’s vice president for global strategy and deputy provost for international affairs (above, at center), during the program’s closing ceremony held recently at the Greenberg Conference Center.

Established in 2013, the Dialogue was created through a partnership between Yale University and the All-China Youth Federation. The visiting delegation, comprised of provincial youth organization leaders, government and party officials, and private sector executives, spent a week at Yale engaging with faculty, students, World Fellows, and local officials to discuss topics ranging from U.S. politics and policies to innovation, education, and governance. The group then traveled to Washington, D.C. for meetings with U.S. government officials and experts on U.S.-China relations to discuss other matters of mutual interest.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/11/05/program-offers-chinese-youth-leaders-perspectives-us-government

 

ANY & WWN 2018 Women’s Leadership Series with Asha Rangappa

Monday, December 3 | 12 – 1 PM | Slifka Center, 80 Wall Street

Join the Asian Network at Yale (ANY) and Working Women’s Network (WWN) for the next women’s leadership event series with Asha Rangappa, Senior Lecturer at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, and former Associate Dean at Yale Law School. Lunch will be provided.

The focus of the Women’s Leadership Series is to bring together a diverse mix of Yale’s own successful women leaders who, through the discussion of topics relevant to today’s issues, will inspire and encourage women to reflect on their own goals and status as they strive to advance in their careers and lives. The format for the Leadership Series will consist of a moderated discussion with the speaker that will delve into topics of interest in which the speaker will share her personal and professional perspectives on questions. The themes of the series are Leadership, Identity, Career, Well-being, and Service.

REGISTER

Urban Health: State of the Science

https://i1.wp.com/www.bu.edu/sph/files/2018/07/Symp-Urban.png

Thursday, December 6, 2018

8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

breakfast (doors open), 8 a.m.

Hiebert Lounge
72 East Concord Street
Boston

Please Register

Services for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing People Provided

Livestreaming Available During Event

More than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By the year 2030, this will have increased to two-thirds. Urban living is an ubiquitous exposure for health. The day will bring together scholars from around the world to discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with creating health in urban contexts. Presenters will also discuss methods that can advance urban health scholarship and feature case studies from cities that have invested in population health, synthesizing the state of the science of urban health.

Cohosted with Boston University Initiative on Cities and Yale Institute for Global Health.

http://www.bu.edu/sph/news-events/signature-programs/deans-symposia/urban-health-state-of-the-science/

 

 

 

The MacMillan Report featuring Taisu Zhang – The Laws and Economics of Confucianism

Taisu Zhang is an Associate Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He works on comparative legal history, specifically, economic institutions in modern China and early modern Western Europe. He has published a number of articles and essays in academic journals and popular outlets and is the current president of the International Society for Chinese Law and History. We talk with Professor Zhang about his new book, The Laws and Economics of Confucianism: Kinship and Property in Pre-Industrial China and England, which recently received the Gaddis Smith International Book Prize from the MacMillan Center.

Learn more about Taisu Zhang.

Click in and learn!