Yale experts to discuss U.S. strategy toward China

Peter Salovey, Nuno Monteiro, Stephen Roach, Jing Tsu, and Aleh Tsyvinski

Discussions about U.S.-China relations often focus on the latest headlines — a new round of tariffs or fluctuations in financial markets — while overlooking the need to develop a broader strategy for guiding the United States’ approach to China’s rise as a global economic power.

China 2049 — New Era or New Threat,” a panel discussion on Friday, Nov. 2 at the Yale School of Management, will seek to spark a conversation about defining a long-term strategic agenda for U.S. relations with China.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/10/29/yale-experts-discuss-us-strategy-toward-china

In podcast, Lui and Freeman discuss 1882 law banning Chinese citizenship

A duplicate copy of the Certificate of Identity issued to actress Anna May Wong in 1924.

Yale history professors Mary Lui and Joanne Freeman discussed the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 as part of “To Be a Citizen? The History of Becoming American,” the first episode of Classroom Connections, a new series produced by the weekly podcast BackStory.

BackStory uses current events in America to take a deep dive into the nation’s past. The show features U.S. historians Ed Ayers, Brian Balogh, Nathan Connolly, and Freeman, professor of history and American studies at Yale.

The new Classroom Connections series offers accompanying resources for K-12 educators and gives teachers an opportunity to get involved with the production of episodes.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/10/30/podcast-lui-and-freeman-discuss-1882-law-banning-chinese-citizenship

 

Hong Kong: Global or Chinese Capital?

Hong Kong’s reputation as an international financial powerhouse thrived under democratic principles of free speech, free assembly and free trade. But Beijing leaders would prefer speedier integration with China and what they regard as more patriotism. “Tension between these perceptions has long existed, but a series of developments have made them far more pronounced and could eventually undermine Hong Kong’s international status, driving foreign companies and finance houses to Singapore or elsewhere,” explains journalist Philip Bowring. “Hong Kong citizens could also find themselves deprived of benefits such as visa-free entry to dozens of countries that they enjoy – and other Chinese do not.” Tensions emerged with Xi Jinping’s presidency in 2013 and the Umbrella Movement protests in 2014. More recently, a trade battle with the United States and denial of a work visa for a Financial Times journalist signal more controls may be on the way. Bowring points out that China will struggle to simultaneously relish Hong Kong’s financial success and punish it for autonomy. The region’s special economic status for US trade, as outlined by the 1992 US-HK Policy Act, could be under threat. – YaleGlobal

Exploiting Sino-Russian Nuclear Divergence

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As the United States begins its latest push to acquire next-generation nuclear weapons, the Kremlin has responded in lockstep by increasing its own nuclear arsenal and pressing Washington on arms control. China holds back and instead chooses to stick to conventional military forces and gaining global influence through soft power. China, considerably more competitive than Russian economically and diplomatically, is preoccupied by the nuclear buildup on its own border by North Korea and how that might expand. Richard Weitz, a senior fellow and the director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at the Hudson Institute, explains that the United States could use this divergence to its own strategic advantage. Weitz argues that the United States has an opportunity to include China in US-Russian nuclear arms control negotiations, which could lead to Russia pressuring China from enlarging Beijing’s nuclear offensive capabilities. — YaleGlobal

Asian Values

Power and values: A Rohingya survivor of genocide in Myanmar pleads for food, and Hungary’s rightwing Prime Minister Viktor Orbán finds common cause with China’s Premier Li Keqiang

Countries that join together through multilateral organizations, whether the Association of Southeast Asian Nations or the United Nations, must determine the values required for pursuit of common goals. Yet there is stark contrast between Asian and western values – with Asia generally focused on order and the collective interest and the West traditionally emphasizing democracy and individual rights. Asia’s many governments – caught between two rivals, China and the United States – could have some influence over which ideals prevail for the continent: “if Asia cannot define its values more clearly, it risks a replay of the Cold War, where it suffered in confrontation between superpowers with deeply opposing ideologies,” explains journalist and author Humphrey Hawksley. A charter on Asian values could provide guidance on a rising China, prevent polarization and reduce hypocrisy of democratic nations failing to respect human rights. A united and thoughtful voice would strengthen Asia. Hawksley urges the continent’s leaders to forge a path in articulating values that contribute to reducing tensions and increasing prosperity. – YaleGlobal

Rethinking Belt-and-Road Debt

Transport trouble: Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad criticizes China’s “new colonialism” at Beijing’s Great Hall of the People, and Chinese-built railway connects parts of Africa

More than 75 nations participate in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, launched in 2013 to develop trade and connect Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe with ports, roads and railways. But some countries worry about adding to already heavy debt burdens, and some projects have become an issue in local politics. Among the most vocal critics is Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad who has warned about a “new colonialism,” explains veteran journalist Philip Bowring. Mahathir questions infrastructure costs and strategic purposes relating to contentious issues like control over the South China Sea. Many emerging economies can certainly benefit from the infrastructure investment, explains Bowring, but cautious leaders also recognize the value of assessing project purposes and priorities. China, wanting to avoid heavy losses or criticism at home about wasteful spending, has launched a publicity campaign to promote benefits of the Belt and Road Initiative. – YaleGlobal