YSPH Grant to Train Health Professionals in China in Bioethics Renewed

Training grant renewed

A School of Public Health program that trains future generations of public health researchers in China has been awarded a grant renewal of $1.25 million from the Fogarty International Center, of the National Institutes of Health, to continue its work.

Since 2011, Associate Professor Kaveh Khoshnood, Ph.D. ’95, M.P.H. ’89, has led a team at Yale and at Central South University (CSU) in Changsha, China, with a focus on bioethics training. The new funding will support the development of a novel interdisciplinary Master of Bioethics (MBE) program at CSU.

http://publichealth.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=15208

Now, Globalization With Chinese Characteristics

Since 2009, when author Wenshan Jia coined the term “Chiglobalization,” China has continued to embrace globalization. China’s leaders have forged ahead with new connections in ways that outpace the rhetoric and globalization endeavors of Europe, the United Kingdom and the United States. “China’s initial effort to exercise global influence is subsequently solidified by the recent exponential growth of her outbound economic clout,” explains Jia, a professor of communication theory, referring to exports and foreign direct investment combined with grassroots connections through education and business. Cross-border interdependence and mutual influences have inspired terms like “Chimerica” and “Chinafornia.” Concerns over trade imbalances and jobs have prompted Donald Trump’s America First policies, which may hurt US soft-power endeavors and speed Chiglobalization. China’s advances in many areas place the country on a path for global leadership. Rather than pursue military connections with bases around the globe, China’s strategy depends on connections, infrastructure development, modernization for developing nations and a larger role in global governance. China once resisted globalization, but now defies containment. – YaleGlobal

http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/now-globalization-chinese-characteristics?utm_source=YaleGlobal+Newsletter&utm_campaign=403f1d17c7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_01_30&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2c91bd5e92-403f1d17c7-207760089

South China Sea: US Bargaining Chip or Key Interest?

The United States is either indifferent to freedom-of-navigation rights in the South China Sea or cagey about its strategic interests. The USS Dewey, a guided missile destroyer, moved within 12 nautical miles of Mischief Reef, a land feature occupied by China, explains Donald K. Emmerson. The US Pacific Command had repeatedly been denied permission to conduct such an operation since Donald Trump became president in January. US intentions may puzzle China and its neighbors in Southeast Asia, and Emmerson lists the many questions and possible scenarios. Both Trump, through “transactional dealing,” and his predecessor Barack Obama, through “strategic patience,” emphasize linkage – to motivate Beijing to address other US concerns, including trade imbalances and North Korea’s nuclear weapons program. – YaleGlobal

http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/south-china-sea-us-bargaining-chip-or-key-interest?utm_source=YaleGlobal+Newsletter&utm_campaign=30e4be4d98-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_01_30&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2c91bd5e92-30e4be4d98-207760089#overlay-context=

ASEAN Summit’s China Tilt Portends a New World Order

The South China Sea quandary continues. In summer of 2016, the international Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague issued a ruling in a case brought by the Philippines, rejecting China’s claims to most of the sea along with construction of artificial islands. The Philippines, under Rodrigo Duterte, refused to embrace the ruling – instead moving closer to China in the hope of trade deals. So it’s no surprise that other members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, during a 50 anniversary meeting in Manila, backed away from a statement criticizing China for failing to respect members’ claims under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, explains author June Teufel Dreyer, professor of political science with the University of Miami. In turn, the United States has halted freedom-of-navigation exercises in the South China Sea. “Capitulation to China’s wishes does not necessarily translate into friendship,” Dreyer warns. The United States, ASEAN and other nations must clarify foreign policy to stand up for international norms. Or, the world must adjust to a new regional order, with China firmly in charge of the South China Sea.

Alumni’s gift founds Yale China Fund for Emotional Intelligence

A $3 million gift from two Yale alumni will help establish the Yale China Fund for Emotional Intelligence, which will assist Chinese educators to incorporate principles of emotional intelligence into programs for children 3 to 6 years old.

The effort will be spearheaded by Yale Child Study researchers Marc Brackett, Dena Simmons, Walter Gilliam, and Tong Liu and will feature implementation of RULER, an innovative program created at Yale that helps teachers and students incorporate concepts of emotional regulation in the classroom and that has been shown to improve student performance and educational experience.

The field of emotional intelligence is anchored in the seminal work of Yale President Peter Salovey and fellow psychologist John D. Mayer. Their research became the basis of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.

“When I articulated the concept of emotional intelligence in 1990, I could not predict the impact that it would have and how it would resonate throughout the world,” said Salovey. “I am very proud that the idea has taken root in China. With the establishment of the new Yale China Fund for Emotional Intelligence as a focal point for pioneering research and programs, I hope that future generations in China will have more opportunities to cultivate the emotional skills that they need to succeed in life.”

http://news.yale.edu/2017/04/17/alumni-s-gift-founds-yale-china-fund-emotional-intelligence?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=yn-04-17-17

Students awarded Light Fellowships for language study in East Asia

The Richard U. Light Fellowship Program has announced that 136 Yale students will receive full funding to attend intensive language programs in China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan in 2017-2018.

The fellowship program is celebrating its 20th year this year.

This year’s Light Fellows include undergraduate students from 12 residential colleges representing 26 majors; three master’s degree students and five Ph.D. candidates in the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences; one master’s degree student in the School of Management; and two students working on master’s degrees at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. A full list of the winners is posted on the Light Fellowship website.

http://news.yale.edu/2017/04/18/students-awarded-light-fellowships-language-study-east-asia?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=yn-04-20-17