Yale Women For Africa Forum, 2018

Over the last 20 years, women have increased their presence in governments across Africa, but — like their peers elsewhere — they still lag far behind men. Through its Leadership Forum for Strategic Impact, Yale is working to enhance the knowledge and skills of senior African women leaders and to build a network of peers and thought leaders across the continent. This video illustrates how the Forum — supported by La Fundación Mujeres por África (the Women for Africa Foundation) and Banco Santander — helps to successfully amplify the effectiveness and influence of women in African governments.

Alumni volunteers’ efforts made ‘real difference’ in South African township

Two Yale alumni speak to 10th graders in South Africa as part of a tutoring program.

Yale Alumni Service Corps (YASC) is in its landmark 10th year, having organized trips across the globe that have helped thousands of people in underserved communities ranging from Brazil to India to West Virginia — all while leaving a lasting impression on the hundreds of alumni who have volunteered.

Recently, Rob Biniaz ’75 led more than 90 Yale alumni, family, and friends on a trip to Cape Town, South Africa, to undertake a broad series of service initiatives. The trip was the first for YASC in South Africa and its first-ever in an urban community.

In conjunction with the Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Management, University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business, Business Activator, and Amandla Development, a local nonprofit founded and led by Scott Clarke ’02, YASC volunteers worked in Cape Town’s Philippi Township to create sustainable, integral projects designed to live on long after the time the volunteers have left.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/08/23/alumni-volunteers-efforts-made-real-difference-south-african-township?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ynalumni-09-06-18

YYAS helps African students navigate path to higher education abroad

In Rwanda, Yale student instructor Elizabeth Olatunji ’20 shows YYAS students how to access online university applications.

Yale Young African Scholars (YYAS), a flagship program of the Yale Africa Initiative, held sessions in Kigali, Rwanda July 29-Aug. 7, and in Accra, Ghana Aug. 11-20.

This year, the program, which aims to make higher education more accessible to Africa’s most talented student leaders, included a cohort of more than 300 students who were chosen from nearly 2,000 applicants from 34 African countries. The program is administered by Yale staff and more than 20 Yale undergraduate and graduate students — most of whom hail from the continent themselves — who serve as instructors and mentors to the participants by leading discussion on a variety of topics ranging from the arts and the humanities, social sciences, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

https://news.yale.edu/2018/08/17/yyas-helps-african-students-navigate-path-higher-education-abroad?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ynalumni-09-06-18

 

Alumni volunteers’ efforts made ‘real difference’ in South African township

Yale Alumni Service Corps members in South Africa.

Yale Alumni Service Corps (YASC) is in its landmark 10th year, having organized trips across the globe that have helped thousands of people in underserved communities ranging from Brazil to India to West Virginia — all while leaving a lasting impression on the hundreds of alumni who have volunteered.

Recently, Rob Biniaz ’75 led more than 90 Yale alumni, family, and friends on a trip to Cape Town, South Africa, to undertake a broad series of service initiatives. The trip was the first for YASC in South Africa and its first-ever in an urban community.

In conjunction with the Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Management, University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business, Business Activator, and Amandla Development, a local nonprofit founded and led by Scott Clarke ’02, YASC volunteers worked in Cape Town’s Philippi Township to create sustainable, integral projects designed to live on long after the time the volunteers have left.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/08/23/alumni-volunteers-efforts-made-real-difference-south-african-township

Ancient Egyptian graffiti, burial sites discovered by Yale archaeologists

Ancient Egyptian cave art from 3,300 B.C.E., depicting an addax, or antelope

A team of archaeologists — led by Yale Egyptologist John Darnell — has uncovered a “lost oasis” of archaeological activity in the eastern Egyptian desert of Elkab.

The researchers from the Elkab Desert Survey Project — a joint mission of Yale and the Royal Museums of Art and History Brussels working in collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities and the Inspectorate of Edfu — surveyed the area of Bir Umm Tineidba, once thought to be devoid of any major archaeological remains. Instead, the team unearthed “a wealth of archaeological and epigraphic material,” says Darnell, including a number of examples of ancient rock art or “graffiti,” the burial site of an Egyptian woman, and a previously unrecorded, enigmatic Late Roman settlement.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/07/24/ancient-egyptian-graffiti-burial-sites-discovered-yale-archaeologists?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ynalumni-07-26-18

Yale’s Minja bringing interventional radiology training to Tanzania

These figures show a radiograph taken during transarterial chemoembolization for cancer of the liver

After leading the implementation of a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) to dramatically improve access to medical imaging in his home country of Tanzania, Dr. Frank Minja at Yale School of Medicine (YSM) is working alongside residents and faculty from Yale and other institutions to establish a three-year longitudinal program in Tanzania geared at training radiology residents, nurses, and technologists in interventional radiology.

Interventional radiology (IR) is a versatile and minimally invasive procedure that allows doctors to treat complex medical conditions and diseases through a tiny incision in the skin. IR was initially developed as a subspecialty of diagnostic radiology and has been an established clinical specialty in the United States, Europe, and East Asia since the 1960s, with an estimated 3,000-4,000 practicing IR physicians in the United States alone. However, in most of the world, especially in countries with limited resources like Tanzania, there is little to no access to the numerous benefits of IR because few doctors in those countries have been trained to use it.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/07/17/yales-minja-bringing-interventional-radiology-training-tanzania?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ynalumni-07-26-18

 

A Designer’s Approach to the Cape Town Water Crisis

Cape Town has water problems. Essentially a massive oasis in the desert, the city’s water supply has been drained in recent years by drought and population growth. For a while this year, Cape Town seemed destined to reach “Day Zero,” when the taps would run dry and people would need to stand in line for drinking water. Strong seasonal rains helped push back the date to 2019, but restrictions limiting personal consumption to 50 liters per day remain in effect.

The city has tried a variety of techniques to encourage people to conserve. A class of Yale students has been testing a new approach: design. Led by Jessica Helfand, lecturer in design and management, Yale SOM and Yale School of Architecture students spent the spring semester approaching the water crisis the way a designer would, with an emphasis on collaborating and fostering innovation. Throughout the semester, the course built toward the Cape Town crisis, culminating in a trip to South Africa for a week of on-the-ground research. Split into small groups, the students studied different parts of Cape Town’s civic life—a luxury hotel, a poor township, a wealthy suburb, hospitals, and elder care homes. Back at Yale, they presented their ideas for moving the needle a little more toward conservation. For example, the students working with the Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel suggested playing off a series of historical cartoons hung in the five-star hotel with a version stressing short showers and other water-saving actions. The team whose project was based in a wealthy suburb proposed covers that could turn ubiquitous swimming pools into water storage tanks or aqua gardens.

https://som.yale.edu/news/2018/07/videos-designer-s-approach-to-the-cape-town-water-crisis