Basketball team showcases student-athlete experience in China

Cheered on by over 4,000 Chinese fans at Shanghai’s Baoshan Sports Center, Yale triumphed over the University of California, Berkeley 76 – 59 on Saturday.

But besides training for the big win over Cal, the basketball team also toured the Alibaba headquarters, enjoyed a riverbend cruise and ate local cuisine during its one-week trip across China, which included stops in Suzhou, Hangzhou and Shanghai. Before the trip, basketball players participated in language and culture classes as well as weekly workshops where they learned about Chinese history and practiced basic Chinese phrases. For Director of Athletics Vicky Chun, who was appointed to her position last spring, the team’s trip to China was a realization of her vision to emphasize the dual nature of the student-athlete experience at Yale.

https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2018/11/13/basketball-team-showcases-student-athlete-experience-in-china/

Lessons for the Crisis Fighters

One challenge in studying a once-in-a-century financial crisis is that it only happens once in a century; lessons aren’t easily passed down to the people who will face the next one. Yale SOM’s Andrew Metrick and a team at the Yale Program on Financial Stability are studying the global financial crisis of 2007-09, working to create the knowledge and tools to prepare the next generation of policymakers who find themselves in the eye of a monetary maelstrom.

https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/lessons-for-the-crisis-fighters?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=YLessons%20for%20the%20Crisis%20Fighters&utm_campaign=insights-newsletter-nov-long2018

New Players in a Dollarized World

Dethroning the dollar: European Union President Jean-Claude Juncker with America First Donald Trump; during the 1997 Asian financial crisis, Indonesians fight to obtain dollars

The International Monetary Fund points out that Europe, Latin America and Asia had started a gradual shift from reliance on the US dollar in 2000 that was disrupted by economic crises. The process of seeking alternatives begins anew as advanced and emerging economies alike are disturbed by America First policies that include tariffs and sanctions. The US dollar accounts for more than 60 percent of foreign-exchange reserves and global trade transactions. “Transition from the US dollar-based environment is possible, but will be slow and the new reality will involve a competition from several pretenders for the status of the dominant currency,” explains Michal Romanowski. The rest of the world has long regarded the United States as a safe haven, and ongoing demand allows the country to refinance its debt at low costs. But US dollar dominance complicates monetary policies for Europe, Iran, Turkey and others. Russia is reducing investment in US debt obligations. China, while moving cautiously in this area, takes steps to position the yuan as an international currency. Romanowski concludes that the world should prepare for a more multipolar currency landscape. – YaleGlobal

Mechanical Horses, Galactic Sinbads and Other Unexpected Tales: Exploring the Astonishing Wonders of Classical Literature of the Middle East

Mechanical Horses, Galactic Sinbads and Other Unexpected Tales: Exploring the Astonishing Wonders of Classical Literature
of the Middle East

Presented by: Abdul-Rehman Malik, Postgraduate Associate at the Yale MacMillan Center Council on
Middle East Studies

Saturday December 8th 10:00am – 12:00pm
10:00 – 11:00 Student workshop (grades 7 – 12)
11:00 – 12:00 lecture open to all!
location: 53 Wall Street, New Haven

free parking available in the lot across from the whitney humanities center on wall street

register
Fantasy, science fiction and superheroes have never been more popular! Did you know the classical literature of the Middle East was the source of much early European Sci-Fi writing! In Arabic and Persian, we find stories of mechanical horses that fly, galactic explorations and underwater civilizations. In this workshop and lecture, you will explore some of these astonishing stories by making connections to more modern narratives and hearing a special presentation about some of the historical roots of today’s fantasy and Sci-Fi craze.
To register click here or visit onhsa.yale.edu/MOSAIC

In Post-Khashoggi Saudi Arabia, Business Leaders Have a Chance to Fill a Moral Void

With the U.S. government slow to respond to the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, business leaders took the lead by pulling out of Saudi Arabia’s investor conference. Yale SOM’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld and journalist Roya Hakakian write that continued business activism can help bring about positive change in the Middle East.

https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/in-post-khashoggi-saudi-arabia-business-leaders-have-chance-to-fill-moral-void?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=In%20Post-Khashoggi%20Saudi%20Arabia%2C%20Business%20Leaders%20Have%20a%20Chance%20to%20Fill%20a%20Moral%20Void&utm_campaign=insights-newsletter-nov-long2018

Retirement: No More Golden Years

Seniors in a California home exercise while seated; Japanese elderly work out

The world has inequalities of many kinds, and retirement is no exception. Government-sponsored pensionable retirement programs are popular worldwide, regarded as essential in the wealthiest economies. “Retirement programs are similar in purpose, yet differ considerably in scope, coverage, contributions, requirements, taxes, eligibility and benefits,” explains demography expert Joseph Chamie. “Official retirement ages, for example, range from 50 to 70 years, with most concentrated between 60 and 65 years.” Longer lifespans increase the years people spend in retirement, increasing costs for governments, employers and individual retirees. According to Chamie, solutions include hiking retirement ages and reducing retirement benefits, increasing taxes, shifting from defined-benefit to defined-contribution plans, and promoting incentives among workers to save more and work longer. Protests quickly form when governments move to cut retirement benefits, and many workers worry that a comfortable retirement is not in their future. – YaleGlobal