Yale Club of London: Registration now open for next Theatre Circle Event

Apologies, if you tried and were unable to register for this event yesterday. The issue has been corrected and the event is now open for members’ registration, so please try again.

COST OF LIVING

by Martyna Majok (YSD ’12)

directed by Edward Hall

starring Adrian Lester

followed by Q&A with the cast

Thursday, 28th February 2019

6:30 Networking Drinks at Theatre Bar

7:30 Performance

Post show Q&A in the Theatre

Hampstead Theatre

Eton Avenue, Swiss Cottage

London NW3 3EU

Please Note:  Tickets will be distributed on the night by May Gibson.

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YCL General Admission: £35

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Recalling Turkey’s Peace Process

three Kurdish women hold signs stating Kurds Want Peace; devastation of urban warfare in Suriçi

About 30 million Kurds live throughout the Middle East in Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia. The ethnic group represents about 13 percent of Turkey’s population and at least 7 percent of Syrians, and the United States has long backed Kurds fighting extremists in Syria. Turkey and its Kurdish PKK rebels had arranged a ceasefire in 2013. Then civil war in Syria and Kurdish demands for self-rule heightened tensions, helping consolidate power for the AKP Party that runs the Turkish government. A crackdown ensued and ever-increasing levels of authoritarianism fail to deliver peace, explains Ronay Bakan, a 2018-2019 Fox International Fellow at Yale’s MacMillan Center. Bakan offers two recommendations: First, the Turkish state should create more democratic and inclusionary space for all citizens, including the 72 percent who are ethnic Turks and the 28 percent that represent minorities. Second, the country could decentralize some health, education and social services, allowing greater local control. Increasing democratic participation could reduce the need for authoritarian measures and stabilize the country. – YaleGlobal

Register now for our return 2019 Service Trip to Cape Town, South Africa

Philippi, Cape Town, South Africa
July 25 to August 4, 2019

The Yale Alumni Service Corps is pleased to announce the next in our series of international service trips. We will be returning to the country of South Africa continuing our work in the township of Philippi, an urban community located in Cape Town, South Africa.

Springing from the oldest town in South Africa, Cape Town is known as the “Mother City.” Located on the southwestern tip of the country on the Cape Peninsula, its harbor contains one of the largest container port facilities in the Southern Hemisphere. The city is also one of the key economic centers of South Africa as well as the home of the country’s Parliament.

Amid this prosperity is the township of Philippi, an underserved community of approximately 200,000 residents located in the Cape Flats area of the city southeast of the central business district. Historically a farming community, its population grew in the late 70’s and early 80’s as apartheid policies drove migrants from other parts of South Africa into settlements in the area. Today it faces the challenges of poverty, unemployment, and overcrowding.

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US and China: From Co-Evolution to Decoupling

Henry Kissinger secretly visited China in 1971 to restore US ties, and the Chinese have respected him since. With a trade war underway and US concerns about intellectual property theft, the relationship has soured and transformed: from co-evolution, described by Kissinger as pursuit of domestic imperatives and cooperating as possible to decoupling. “The parochial outlook in the United States and the growing nationalism in China is heading toward disengagement,” explains Vincent Ni, journalist and 2018 Yale Greenberg World Fellow. Ni describes this as disruptive and dangerous, forcing countries to choose sides. Ni urges Chinese and US leaders to develop new rules for 21st century trade, economics and technology while finding ways to cooperate and contribute to global public goods while coexisting militarily. As Kissinger suggested in his writings, a good relationship is essential for world peace and progress even as both nations pursue their own paths of exceptionalism. – YaleGlobal

Dangerous Alliances on Migration

European nations that once promoted human rights are slinking away from these obligations and forming agreements with some third parties that have terrible records on human rights. “The European Union’s migration control policy relies on fortification and deterrence, contributing to massive human rights violations beyond its borders,” explains Lena Riemer, a 2018-2019 Fox International Fellow based at Yale’s MacMillan Center. “Creation of migrant slave markets in Northern Africa, life-threatening attempts to cross border fences into Spanish territory as well as more than 2,000 reported deaths in the Mediterranean this year alone can be traced back in part to the EU’s externalization of migration policy, in force since 2010 and becoming more extreme in 2015.” Opposition to migration is fueling populist demands for tough border policies regardless of horrific conditions, desperation and increasing deaths. Still, the numbers of migrants fleeing war, persecution and climate disasters are climbing worldwide, reports the United Nations. Riemer urges humane border control with comprehensive policies that address the root causes. – YaleGlobal

Yale Young African Scholars Program Launches 2019 Application

Yale Young African Scholars 2018 Program Participants in Ghana.

The Yale Young African Scholars Program (YYAS) is excited to announce that our 2019 application is now available online!

With continued support from the Higherlife Foundation, YYAS brings together African secondary school students between the ages of 15–18 for a tuition-free, intensive academic and leadership program that lasts eight-days per session. Next year the program will be held in three countries—Ghana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe—between late July and end of August.

https://africanscholars.yale.edu/news/yale-young-african-scholars-program-launches-2019-application

The MacMillan Report featuring Rohit De

The MacMillan Report

Rohit De talks about the global history of rebellious lawyering.

December 12, 2018  (12:56)

Rohit De is an Assistant Professor of History at Yale University and an Associate Research Scholar at the Yale Law School. Trained as a lawyer and a historian of South Asia, Professor De has assisted Chief Justice K.G. Balakrishnan of the Supreme Court of India and worked on constitution reform projects in Nepal and Sri Lanka. We talk with Professor De about his current book project, which has the working title of Rights from the Left: Decolonization, Diasporas and the Global History of Rebellious Lawyering.

Learn more about Rohit De.

Click in and learn!