Migration: A Case for Stay and Build

Migrants flee war, persecution, poverty and natural disasters while many others simply seek economic opportunity. The growing numbers challenge the open-door policies of host nations, fueling resentment and populism that targets migration. “And while there is a basic humanitarian obligation to absorb people in dire straits it is only realistic to recognize that no country – no matter how liberal and democratic – can or will accept an endless stream of people without conditions,” explains author Chandran Nair. “‘Brain drain’ and ‘brawn drain,’ taking able-bodied and educated people and under-employing them in developed ones, is clearly harmful to developing countries.” Nair makes a case for the world’s advanced economies to tackle the root causes of migration flows, especially their roles own in military interventions that have displaced millions. Likewise, Nair urges individuals to reconsider migration as the sole way to improve their lives. Instead, many more citizens could stay to build homelands and control destinies on their own terms. – YaleGlobal