Migration: A Case for Stay and Build

Migrants flee war, persecution, poverty and natural disasters while many others simply seek economic opportunity. The growing numbers challenge the open-door policies of host nations, fueling resentment and populism that targets migration. “And while there is a basic humanitarian obligation to absorb people in dire straits it is only realistic to recognize that no country – no matter how liberal and democratic – can or will accept an endless stream of people without conditions,” explains author Chandran Nair. “‘Brain drain’ and ‘brawn drain,’ taking able-bodied and educated people and under-employing them in developed ones, is clearly harmful to developing countries.” Nair makes a case for the world’s advanced economies to tackle the root causes of migration flows, especially their roles own in military interventions that have displaced millions. Likewise, Nair urges individuals to reconsider migration as the sole way to improve their lives. Instead, many more citizens could stay to build homelands and control destinies on their own terms. – YaleGlobal

Looking for Balance Between Conservation and Development in Africa

helen gichohi

Posed as a question, it sounds like a corny joke.

Why do they need to build the highways in Africa so high? So giraffes can walk underneath!

But for ecologists like Helen Gichohi, it’s a legitimate concern. As the African continent aims to modernize its infrastructure and diversify its economy in the decades to come, striking a balance between development and conservation — like building highways high enough above the ground for wildlife to migrate safely underneath — will be paramount.

“I often get asked, ‘Why are you being such an activist?’” Gichohi said during a recent discussion with students from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES). “Because I understand and believe that our continent must develop, but we must do it responsibly in order to secure the iconic wildlife species of Africa.” Gichohi, the former president of the African Wildlife Foundation, is this year’s Dorothy S. McCluskey Visiting Fellow in Conservation at F&ES, a role that welcomes conservation practitioners — particularly women from developing countries — to spend a semester at the School. The Fellowship recipient can pursue independent research, enhance collaborations between F&ES and environmental organizations, and expand professional training opportunities for students.

http://environment.yale.edu/news/article/looking-for-balance-between-conservation-and-development-in-africa/

 

The Sustainable State

A review by Susan Froetschel

The world risks catastrophe by failing to practice sustainability. Only determined governments can come to the rescue, contends Chandran Nair in The Sustainable State.

Sustainability goes beyond the environmental consciousness and boasting common among businesses and even youth. Sustainable living requires sacrifice and revisions of society’s definitions for prosperity and even freedom. The world cannot afford China, India and other developing nations to pursue the West’s ruinous development path. Instead, emerging economies must devise systems that ensure survival and emphasize collective welfare over individual rights.

https://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sustainable-state

Yale Club of London: Registration now open for next Theatre Circle Event

Apologies, if you tried and were unable to register for this event yesterday. The issue has been corrected and the event is now open for members’ registration, so please try again.

COST OF LIVING

by Martyna Majok (YSD ’12)

directed by Edward Hall

starring Adrian Lester

followed by Q&A with the cast

Thursday, 28th February 2019

6:30 Networking Drinks at Theatre Bar

7:30 Performance

Post show Q&A in the Theatre

Hampstead Theatre

Eton Avenue, Swiss Cottage

London NW3 3EU

Please Note:  Tickets will be distributed on the night by May Gibson.

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YCL General Admission: £35

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Recalling Turkey’s Peace Process

three Kurdish women hold signs stating Kurds Want Peace; devastation of urban warfare in Suriçi

About 30 million Kurds live throughout the Middle East in Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran and Armenia. The ethnic group represents about 13 percent of Turkey’s population and at least 7 percent of Syrians, and the United States has long backed Kurds fighting extremists in Syria. Turkey and its Kurdish PKK rebels had arranged a ceasefire in 2013. Then civil war in Syria and Kurdish demands for self-rule heightened tensions, helping consolidate power for the AKP Party that runs the Turkish government. A crackdown ensued and ever-increasing levels of authoritarianism fail to deliver peace, explains Ronay Bakan, a 2018-2019 Fox International Fellow at Yale’s MacMillan Center. Bakan offers two recommendations: First, the Turkish state should create more democratic and inclusionary space for all citizens, including the 72 percent who are ethnic Turks and the 28 percent that represent minorities. Second, the country could decentralize some health, education and social services, allowing greater local control. Increasing democratic participation could reduce the need for authoritarian measures and stabilize the country. – YaleGlobal

Register now for our return 2019 Service Trip to Cape Town, South Africa

Philippi, Cape Town, South Africa
July 25 to August 4, 2019

The Yale Alumni Service Corps is pleased to announce the next in our series of international service trips. We will be returning to the country of South Africa continuing our work in the township of Philippi, an urban community located in Cape Town, South Africa.

Springing from the oldest town in South Africa, Cape Town is known as the “Mother City.” Located on the southwestern tip of the country on the Cape Peninsula, its harbor contains one of the largest container port facilities in the Southern Hemisphere. The city is also one of the key economic centers of South Africa as well as the home of the country’s Parliament.

Amid this prosperity is the township of Philippi, an underserved community of approximately 200,000 residents located in the Cape Flats area of the city southeast of the central business district. Historically a farming community, its population grew in the late 70’s and early 80’s as apartheid policies drove migrants from other parts of South Africa into settlements in the area. Today it faces the challenges of poverty, unemployment, and overcrowding.

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US and China: From Co-Evolution to Decoupling

Henry Kissinger secretly visited China in 1971 to restore US ties, and the Chinese have respected him since. With a trade war underway and US concerns about intellectual property theft, the relationship has soured and transformed: from co-evolution, described by Kissinger as pursuit of domestic imperatives and cooperating as possible to decoupling. “The parochial outlook in the United States and the growing nationalism in China is heading toward disengagement,” explains Vincent Ni, journalist and 2018 Yale Greenberg World Fellow. Ni describes this as disruptive and dangerous, forcing countries to choose sides. Ni urges Chinese and US leaders to develop new rules for 21st century trade, economics and technology while finding ways to cooperate and contribute to global public goods while coexisting militarily. As Kissinger suggested in his writings, a good relationship is essential for world peace and progress even as both nations pursue their own paths of exceptionalism. – YaleGlobal