The Higher Education Learning Crisis

University of Denver graduates celebrate by throwing caps in air; journalism class at University of Missouri with more than 150 students

Reading, thinking and writing allow individuals to magnify their influence, noted 20th century writer and philosopher Aldous Huxley. Society expects education to open opportunities for students to improve themselves and their societies, and yet there is a crisis in American undergraduate higher education as students simply do not learn, explain Richard H. Hersh and Richard Keeling. Hersh, formerly president of Trinity College and Hobart and Smith Colleges, now teaches at Yale, and Keeling is president of Keeling & Associates, a higher education consulting practice. “Other countries have increasingly emulated American universities because of prestigious worldwide rankings, but such emulation may be hollow as rankings are based on scholarship and research prowess, measured by numbers of publications and scholarly citations, not undergraduate learning,” they write. “Too many graduates are not prepared to think critically and creatively, speak and write cogently, solve problems, comprehend complex issues, accept accountability, take the perspective of others, or meet employer expectations.” Hersh and Keeling urge faculty and students alike to embrace the ongoing cumulative and collective nature of higher learning while constantly aiming for higher standards of competence. – YaleGlobal

 

Experiment to Save an Endangered Fish Holds Lessons for Policymakers

It’s no accident that Indiana Jones was an archeologist, not an economist. Economists are better known for digging into data sets than digging up clues. But in recent years, a number of economists, particularly development economists, have led a revolution in the field—by going into the field.

Many of these new adventurers are motivated to better understand which new policies, philanthropic programs, or other interventions have the greatest positive impact for people in developing economies. The randomized controlled trial has become a key tool for them to compare the effects of an intervention with what would happen in the absence of such an action.

https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/experiment-to-save-an-endangered-fish-holds-lessons-for-policymakers?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Experiment%20to%20Save%20an%20Endangered%20Fish%20Holds%20Lessons%20for%20Policymakers&utm_campaign=insights-newsletter-nov-long2018-2

 

Committee advises converting Jackson Institute into school of global affairs

55 Hillhouse Ave., home of the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs at Yale.

Yale’s Jackson Institute should become a school of global affairs featuring a robust, faculty-driven research program dedicated to solving real-world problems and shaping a better future for humanity, according to a vision described in an advisory committee report released Nov. 14.

Founded in 2010 largely as a teaching enterprise through a generous gift from John Jackson ’67 and Susan Jackson, the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs currently houses a thriving educational program that serves hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students each year. In 2017, Provost Benjamin Polak convened an advisory committee of eight senior faculty members to consider the institute’s future and assess whether Jackson should be transformed into an independent professional school.

https://news.yale.edu/2018/11/14/committee-advises-converting-jackson-institute-school-global-affairs?utm_source=YNemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ynalumni-11-15-18

 

Lessons from Global Network Week in Ghana

Frank Ciminiello

On a plastic chair, she sat off to the side in a thin white shirt, refusing the needlestick. Fever and weakness were upon her, yet she would not allow the staff to test her for malaria. Only when the volunteer and her new friend—an American graduate student on a volunteer program at the orphanage—came back did Angelica even consider allowing the test. That is how the orphanage survived: through scattered volunteers, zero government assistance, philanthropic Ghanaians, and day by day. For Angelica, 10 years old by calendar but appearing no older than eight, it was no different. The food and financial donations given that day, coordinated by Yale School of Management Executive MBA student Phoenica Fitts and University of Ghana Business School coordinator Yvonne Barnieh, would help for a day or two, hopefully long enough for her test to come back and for her to start feeling better.

https://som.yale.edu/blog/lessons-from-global-network-week-in-ghana

 

Yale Club of Ireland: House Plays, December 21

House Plays is returning to 12 Henrietta Street at 7 p.m. on December 21, at a performance in aid of An Taisce.

Advance tickets are €50, tickets at the door cost €70. The Yale Club of Ireland is offering two free tickets to current Yale students or alumni who graduated less than five years ago, on a first-come first-served basis. E-mail ciaran@aya.yale.edu to bagsy the tickets.

Mulled wine, mince pies, salmon, seasonal delicacies and vin santo are included in the price. There will be over 30 different raffle prizes for those looking for last-minute Christmas gifts.

Online payments can be made via PayPal to minatenison@gmail.com or via bank transfer. For further details e-mail minatenison@gmail.com or call +353894588066.

House Plays tells the story of Clare. Over four acts, the play follows Clare, who was raised in a big Georgian house but is finding that her enviable life is falling apart at the seams.

Number 12 Henrietta Street was the grandest house in 18th Century Dublin, located on a street deemed the most beautiful in Europe. Today it’s gothically decrepit and is on the new Luas line. Come on over!

Basketball team showcases student-athlete experience in China

Cheered on by over 4,000 Chinese fans at Shanghai’s Baoshan Sports Center, Yale triumphed over the University of California, Berkeley 76 – 59 on Saturday.

But besides training for the big win over Cal, the basketball team also toured the Alibaba headquarters, enjoyed a riverbend cruise and ate local cuisine during its one-week trip across China, which included stops in Suzhou, Hangzhou and Shanghai. Before the trip, basketball players participated in language and culture classes as well as weekly workshops where they learned about Chinese history and practiced basic Chinese phrases. For Director of Athletics Vicky Chun, who was appointed to her position last spring, the team’s trip to China was a realization of her vision to emphasize the dual nature of the student-athlete experience at Yale.

https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2018/11/13/basketball-team-showcases-student-athlete-experience-in-china/

Lessons for the Crisis Fighters

One challenge in studying a once-in-a-century financial crisis is that it only happens once in a century; lessons aren’t easily passed down to the people who will face the next one. Yale SOM’s Andrew Metrick and a team at the Yale Program on Financial Stability are studying the global financial crisis of 2007-09, working to create the knowledge and tools to prepare the next generation of policymakers who find themselves in the eye of a monetary maelstrom.

https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/lessons-for-the-crisis-fighters?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=YLessons%20for%20the%20Crisis%20Fighters&utm_campaign=insights-newsletter-nov-long2018